Friday, 30 March 2012

WW1 German Panzers Part 7

Part 7

 After the examination of the British Tank Ludendorff ordered that the A7V copy the Configuration of the Track from the British Tank.the VPK Dragged its heels because it would delay the Tank it was formally ordered on September 1st 1917. The Variant was known as the A7V-U (Prototype was not ready until June 1918.



                                             The A7V-U  1918  ( weight 39.6 tonnes crew of 7)


March 1917 the VPK tried to get the A7V programme moving faster and get the order up to 100 Tanks but
was opposed by the OHL and the Chef-Kraft Chief of tactical Vehicles. The first A7V Chassis was ready on April 30 1917 at the Daimler Test Track. battle conditions was created but problems happen when the A7V tried to turn at one point a track broke and many was critical of its lack of cross-country ability. it was said it could only be used in defensive and not offensive on May 14, 1917 another test was done this time the chassis had mock wooden armour. it was still poorly suited to trench crossing.

The Commission recommended that two tank detachments be created  from the  ten A7Vs on order
and another ten be ordered of A7V armoured bodies as reserve. and tank production be increased to 100
once the A7V had proved itself.
the programme only got priority 2 armour plating the reason being is the French had use there Schneider tanks at Berry-aux-Bac on April 1917 but suffered from the German guns.




                                                      The French Schneider Tank                                                      

The German army plans was to remain on defensive mode for the rest of the year so no need for a tank.
Germany industrial were at there limit and funds was stretched and it was very hard for approval from all the Prussian  departments for any new programmes.


   
  

4 comments:

  1. I guess I can understand the reluctance of the German High Command to invest much time and resources into tank development if they had decided to remain on the defensive.

    Who knows what might have happened if they had fully committed to tank development and had a lot more vehicles available to them when Ludendorff launched his Kaiserschlacht Offensive in March 1918 when the German Army once again just failed to reach Paris?

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  2. could have been a diffrent story all together if they put funds into the Tanks

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  3. Im really enjoying this series on German tanks, Vinnie.
    Just out of curiousity, and maybe it's mentioned in an earlier post, when did the word "Panzer" become standard in German? I know that "tank" in English really started as a codeword, and then became the name of the bloody things, just wondered it if was a similar thing in German?

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  4. well all I know is the first German Tank units was called
    Sturm PanzerKraftwagen Abteilungen or Sturka for short Il try and find out for you but I dont know my self

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